Monday, January 24, 2011

Lessons we learn from the Moon

Photo taken January 12, 2011

Beside taking this picture of the full moon last week.. which I think looks very similar to an eye and an pupil. my friend wrote the following about the full moon yesterday. I thought I would post the picture with his comments:

There really is no static position in nature. The full moon of two nights ago is now replaced by the waning gibbous immediately as the light begins to be lost. Nor does the half-moon last longer than a single night, followed by the waning crescent. When the moon's light is altogether stricken, the new moon phase begins with the waxing crescent which is, at first, only a sliver. But it follows nightly through the waxing crescent, to the half moon, to the waxing gibbous, to the full moon. Always in motion. Always either growing or receding in light.

So also with the sun. From solstice to equinox, to solstice to equinox, it grows, then dims. Never static. It is impossible to freeze the light. It will grow or it will fade.

All things in nature testify of the truth. This includes things in the "heavens" or sky above, as well as things on, in and under the earth. (Moses 6: 63.)
It is not possible for an individual, nor a collection of individuals, to remain static. They are either involved with restoring truth or in apostasy from it; never merely "preserving" it. Those who claim to merely preserve the truth given them are concealing the fact of their apostasy. They are soothing their conscience. Caretakers simply cannot exist.

All great truths are simple, and they are testified of in nature as well as in scripture.

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